Trendnet debuts 450Mbps Wireless-N access point

Trendnet announces the first Wireless-N access point that offers speeds up to 450Mbps.

The first 450Mbps access point from TrendNet.
The first 450Mbps access point from TrendNet. TrendNet

As if offering what appears to be the first 450Mbps Wireless-N router on the market, the TEW-691GR, weren't enough, Trendnet today announced that it's shipping the first access point offering the same speed, the 450Mbps Wireless-N TEW-690AP.

An access point, which doesn't have routing functionality, is designed to add wireless capability to a nonwireless router or network. A wireless router has both routing functionality and a built-in access point. The new Trendnet access point, therefore, is a good solution for an existing network that doesn't have wireless capability or one that has legacy wireless, such as Wireless-G or Wireless-B. It's also good for those who want to replace their existing 300Mbps Wireless-N networks with a faster one.

Like most recent wireless devices, the new TEW-690AP supports advanced multiple input multiple output (MIMO) antenna technology. It comes with three antennas and can handle three spatial streams per antenna. Hence, it generates a maximum theoretical wireless throughput of 450Mbps.

To support this higher wireless speed, the access point has one Gigabit Ethernet port, as opposed to a traditional 10/100Mbps port seen in most others, to connect to a router. Trendnet says the new device can offers four separate SSIDs (wireless networks) at a time and supports Wi-Fi Protected Setup, a feature that allows for adding wireless clients to the network without users having to type in the encryption key manually.

The company says it will be showcasing the new 450Mbps Wireless-N TEW-690AP Access Point at CES 2011 together with other unannounced devices.

The TEW-690AP is currently available. It's slated to cost $200 and comes with a three-year warranty.

About the author

CNET editor Dong Ngo has been involved with technology since 2000, starting with testing gadgets and writing code for CNET Labs' benchmarks. He now manages CNET San Francisco Labs, reviews networking and storage products, and also writes about other topics from online security to new gadgets and how technology impacts the life of people around the world.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Don't Miss
Hot Products
Trending on CNET

HOT ON CNET

Love heavy and clunky tablets?

Said no one ever. CNET brings you the lightest and thinnest tablets on the market.