TrekDesk hits the market, exhausts our soles

TrekDesk, the height-adjustable workstation that attaches to a treadmill, joins a growing population of walk-while-you-work desks that beg the question: are we addicted to work?

TrekDesk, the $479 height-adjustable workstation that attaches to a treadmill, joins a growing population of walk-while-you-work desks. TrekDesk

The TrekDesk press release is packed with all sorts of alarming statistics about adult obesity, as well as alluring statistics about the benefits of walking. The combination is designed to make you want one, and want one now, in spite of the product's $479-sans-treadmill price tag.

Why go for a lovely walk outside, or exercise on an ordinary treadmill inside, when you can walk at your desk--without even sweating? It is "Easy to Do" and "Requires No Extra Effort." (The All Caps mean they Really Mean It.)

TrekDesk is by no means the first attempt to turn sedentary workstations into something less sedentary, and should not be singled out as such. For two years now, the JW Treadmill Desk has boasted a built-in rack for multiple monitors, just in case you don't have enough things going on.

And the aptly named Walkstation 's $6,500 price tag seems intended to guilt its owners into years of use to make up for money that could have been spent on such healthy items as gym memberships and fresh produce.

With our increasingly mobile workstations, humans are already eating, driving, and admit it, even using the toilet while working. Now that we can walk while we work, what does a workaholic multitasker have left? Sex?

 

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