TransferJet: Sony's answer to wireless USB

With TransferJet, phones and cameras will just have to nuzzle to trade data at a fast rate.

LAS VEGAS--Sony's got its own solution for shuttling data wirelessly.

TransferJet, a technology under development at the Japanese electronics giant, passes data between cameras, cell phones, video cameras, and other devices at 375 megabits per second (sustained) to 500 megabits per second (optimal). The idea behind TransferJet is to let people swap music or photos without worrying about wires.

While the technology functions like a wireless USB cable, it is an entirely new technology, Sony said.

Want to give someone a video clip from your camera? Just stick it next to a phone with TransferJet embedded in it and press go. The file swaps over. Sony unveiled the technology for the first time during a press conference at the Consumer Electronics Show taking place here this week.

The technology, moreover, is somewhat insulated from privacy concerns because the two devices can only be 1.75 inches away from each other for the connection to work. Someone would have to snuggle up awfully close to extract the contact list from your phone.

TransferJet in action Michael Kanellos

It could also be embedded into kiosks so shoppers could download songs at a record store. In the picture, the video camera sits on a large TransferJet module. But when it comes out in products, cameras and whatnot will just speak directly (albeit wirelessly.)

Randy Waynick, senior vice president of marketing at Sony Electronics, tried to demonstrate it during the press conference and it failed to work. The TransferJet stations at the Sony booth, however, worked fine. Sony showed a TransferJet-enabled video camera sending video to a PC and a camera sending photos to a PC. It was the coolest new thing in the Sony booth.

Ultimately, Sony hopes to embed TransferJet into products. The company has not announced a schedule to put it into products yet.

 

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