Transfer AutoCorrect settings to a new PC

A simple Word macro backs up, restores, and lets you transfer your custom AutoCorrect entries.

If you create custom AutoCorrect entries to speed up your typing in Microsoft Word as I described on Monday, you might need to move those entries to another PC someday.

Years ago, Dave Rado wrote a Word macro for backing up and restoring the program's AutoCorrect files. It still works for Word 2007--or at least it did on my PC.

First, make sure macros are enabled. In Word 2003, click Tools > Macro > Security > Security Level, and select either of the bottom two options. In Word 2007, click the Office button, choose Word Options > Trust Center > Trust Center Settings > Macro Settings, select "Enable all macros (not recommended; potentially dangerous code can run)," and click OK twice.

Microsoft Word 2007 Macro Security dialog box
Make sure macros are enabled in Word before you run the AutoCorrect backup script. Microsoft

With Word's macros enabled, double-click the AutoCorrect.dot file inside the AutoCorrect.zip download. Choose Backup, and when the Save As dialog box opens, select the removable medium or network address you'll use to transfer the settings to the other system.

AutoCorrect macro for Microsoft Word
Run the AutoCorrect.dot macro to back up your settings and restore them on another PC. Dave Rado

Repeat the steps on the second system, but choose Restore rather than Backup when the macro runs, click Yes at the warning, point to the backup file you created, and click Open.

Tomorrow: a free program warns you about potentially dangerous sites just before you click the link.

About the author

    Dennis O'Reilly began writing about workplace technology as an editor for Ziff-Davis' Computer Select, back when CDs were new-fangled, and IBM's PC XT was wowing the crowds at Comdex. He spent more than seven years running PC World's award-winning Here's How section, beginning in 2000. O'Reilly has written about everything from web search to PC security to Microsoft Excel customizations. Along with designing, building, and managing several different web sites, Dennis created the Travel Reference Library, a database of travel guidebook reviews that was converted to the web in 1996 and operated through 2000.

     

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