Transcend curries 4K favor with faster SD cards

For videographers shooting high-resolution video, the Taiwanese flash-card maker has two new choices with faster write speeds and capacities up to 128GB.

Transcend's Extreme model of UHS-1 Class 3 SD card has read speeds of 95MBps, write speeds of 85MBps, and a maximum capacity of 64GB.
The Transcend Extreme UHS-1 Class 3 SD card. Transcend
Memory card maker Transcend announced higher-speed SD cards on Friday that are geared for videographers shooting high-resolution 4K video.

Transcend's new SDHC and SDXC cards are graded UHS-1 Class 3 and come in two varieties. The "Extreme" models have read and write speeds of 95MBps and 85MBps, respectively.

The non-extreme models have read and write speeds of 95MBps and 60MBps, respectively.

The newer UHS-1 (Ultra High Speed) Class 3 specification requires sustained write performance of 30MBps.

gbspecsdu30314.jpg
Transcend's lower-end UHS-1 Class 3 card. Transcend

Yes, SD card categorization is a bottomless pit of acronyms. And here are two more: SDHC and SDXC, which govern maximum capacity. SDHC models top out at 32GB capacity, but SDXC can go much, much higher.

Transcend's SDXC models reach 128GB, enough for 8 hours of UltraHD video shot at a resolution of 4096x2160, with a 35Mbps bitrate and the H.264 AVC compression standard. The Extreme models top out at 64GB, though.

The SDXC Extreme models cost $59 for 32GB and $119 for 64GB. The somewhat slower models cost $49 for 64GB and $109 for 128GB.

The SD Card Association's attempt to demystify their flash cards' transfer-speed ratings.
The SD Card Association's attempt to demystify the transfer-speed ratings of its flash cards. SD Card Association

About the author

Stephen Shankland has been a reporter at CNET since 1998 and covers browsers, Web development, digital photography and new technology. In the past he has been CNET's beat reporter for Google, Yahoo, Linux, open-source software, servers and supercomputers. He has a soft spot in his heart for standards groups and I/O interfaces.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Don't Miss
Hot Products
Trending on CNET

HOT ON CNET

Delete your photos by mistake?

Whether you've deleted everything on your memory card or there's been a data corruption, here's a way to recover those photos.