Total economic cost of insecure software: $180 billion a year in the U.S

Software security is an oft overlooked area. A new book sheds some light on the topic.

David Rice's book Geekonomics: The Real Cost of Insecure Software calls the software industry to account for its careless attitude toward security.

As reported on Forbes.com: Rice blames the software industry for a litany of hidden costs, ranging from the infrastructure needed to fix hackable bugs in software to recent data breaches at the U.S. State Department and the Pentagon--even a Boeing 747 crash in 2005 that resulted from software glitches. All told, he places the total economic cost of security flaws in software at around $180 billion a year.

Companies like Oracle or Microsoft say their software is unbreakable or trustworthy. But those statements are vacuous and cheap to make, and there's no consequences for when they're wrong.

I didn't receive the book yet so I am not sure how much mention of open source it contains. But you certainly can't make the argument that the risk is hidden such as with proprietary products.

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About the author

Dave Rosenberg has more than 15 years of technology and marketing experience that spans from Bell Labs to startup IPOs to open-source and cloud software companies. He is CEO and founder of Nodeable, co-founder of MuleSoft, and managing director for Hardy Way. He is an adviser to DataStax, IT Database, and Puppet Labs.

 

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