Toshiba ZL2 glasses-free 3D TV on sale Monday, costs £7,000

Toshiba's glasses-free 3D telly goes on sale on Monday, for a wallet-combusting seven grand. Ouch!

Toshiba's ZL2 glasses-free 3D is going on sale on Monday -- yours for the wallet-combusting cost of £7,000.

That's right folks, from 12 March you'll be able to walk into the John Lewis on London's Oxford Street and throw down seven grand to acquire this hoity-toity telly. It'll be available from Harrods from the 16th.

The telly itself measures a room-consuming 55 inches, and has a mammoth 3,840x2,160-pixel display. It outputs Full HD 3D without the need for you to wear dorky 3D spectacles, using similar tech that you'd find in the Nintendo 3DS, with two images fired out of a single screen, one for each eye.

Line your eyes up correctly, and you'll get a 3D effect pumped directly into your brain. Nifty. I've been eyes-on with Toshiba's glasses-free 3D tech ( first spotted in January last year) recently, and I was impressed at how well the effect actually works.

The problem with that lenticular tech is that you need to keep your head held in the right position, and if you move your bonce a little, the effect breaks. Not ideal! Toshiba is trying to get around that though, with some face-tracking tech that keeps an eye on where your peepers are.

Will that work well enough to provide a seamless 3D experience, even as you move around the room or shuffle about on the sofa? We won't know until we get this goggle-box in for review, so my advice is to hold fire for now -- at seven grand you'd need to be darn sure this is the TV to end all TVs.

While Toshiba pushes its glasses-free 3D TV, LG is confident that passive 3D is the future -- this uses cinema-style specs, but those glasses don't require batteries or charging, so they're very cheap, unlike active-shutter glasses.

Which is the best 3D tech? Or should they all go away and leave us in 2D peace? Tell me in the comments, or over on our Facebook wall.

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About the author

Luke Westaway is a senior editor at CNET and writer/ presenter of Adventures in Tech, a thrilling gadget show produced in our London office. Luke's focus is on keeping you in the loop with a mix of video, features, expert opinion and analysis.

 

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