Tiny gadget eases tire pressure worries

A new tire-mounted air pressure gauge puts safety and better fuel economy at drivers' fingertips.

TiroGage air pressure gauge RMI

California-based company Resource Manufacturing Inc. (RMI), along with Wika Instrument, the world's largest gauge manufacturer, are touting their new air pressure gauge as the answer to every lazy motorist's prayer.

The patented TiroGage, which is designed to be left on, attaches directly to the tire's valve stem. The pressure reading is displayed constantly on an outer lens, which allows drivers to check their tires with just a quick glance. Air can be added or released through the gauge itself, eliminating the need for external gauges or valve stem caps.

This is great news for those of us (your writer included) who procrastinate when it comes to checking the air pressure in our tires. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) recommends checking the air pressure on each tire a minimum of once a month. But how many of us do it? Maintaining proper air pressure is crucial for achieving optimal fuel economy, maximizing performance, increasing tire life and ensuring road safety.

RMI says the TiroGage is accurate within 3 percent (plus or minus) in tire temperatures between -40 and 150 degrees Fahrenheit. The body of the gauge is made of brass and the lens is made of Lexan, the same material used for bullet-proof windshields. The entire device weighs less than an ounce and has a diameter slightly larger than a U.S. quarter.

The TiroGage will initially be made for commercial trucks and large RVs and will be available later this month for $24.95 each. Gauges for passenger cars, motorcycles and bicycles are scheduled to roll off the assembly line sometime next year.

For more information on tire pressure, visit the NHTSA Tire Safety Brochure page.

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