Time for vendors to stop foisting IE onto consumers

Adobe Systems has been force-feeding Microsoft's Web browser to its customers. Shouldn't Mozilla's Firefox and other browser makers get a say in the matter?

In a late-night Twitter rant, CNET's Stephen Shankland uncovers a significant error in judgment by software vendors like Adobe Systems: vendors continue to default to Internet Explorer, even as consumers increasingly do not:

Why the hell do Adobe CS4 help and Lightroom geotag links launch Internet Explorer? It's not even my secondary browser, much less default.

In other words, Adobe is trying to second-guess the consumer, presumably to favor either some preconceived notion of what its customers want or some revenue or partnership arrangement with Microsoft.

In either case, vendors like Adobe need to be thinking forward, not looking backward, and the writing is on the wall that Mozilla Firefox is becoming a new standard for Web browsing.

Sure, IE still commands a 68 percent global market share, according to Net Applications, but that share has been on a steady decline for years. Firefox? It has surpassed 21 percent global market share, and it claims more than 30 percent of the market in Europe, growing in popularity nearly every month.

Adobe and other vendors needn't prejudice their applications to Firefox in the way Google has --at least not yet--but they certainly shouldn't be force-feeding IE down customers' throats. An increasing number of people don't want it and, guess what? The customer is always right.

Tags:
Tech Culture
About the author

    Matt Asay is chief operating officer at Canonical, the company behind the Ubuntu Linux operating system. Prior to Canonical, Matt was general manager of the Americas division and vice president of business development at Alfresco, an open-source applications company. Matt brings a decade of in-the-trenches open-source business and legal experience to The Open Road, with an emphasis on emerging open-source business strategies and opportunities. He is a member of the CNET Blog Network and is not an employee of CNET. You can follow Matt on Twitter @mjasay.

     

    Join the discussion

    Conversation powered by Livefyre

    Don't Miss
    Hot Products
    Trending on CNET

    HOT ON CNET

    Find Your Tech Type

    Take our tech personality quiz and enter for a chance to win* high-tech specs!