This week in laptops

Laptop news for the week of February 11.

Ego heart laptop
If this was your Valentines gift, we're sorry. Sybarites

While some sectors of tech were reliving the years 2001 through 2003, the world of laptops soldiered on, driven by the harsh master that is Moore's law. Intel's 45-nanometer Penryn chips crept into several laptops, including the Dell XPS M1730 and two Acer Aspires. Meanwhile, Best Buy is currently showing a one- to two-week delay on MacBook Pros --we'll let you connect the dots.

In other component news, Nvidia was met with yawns when it revealed the specs for two mainstream notebook video cards. A supersecret start-up called Montalvo Systems just might be on the verge of shaking up the processor market. And larger-capacity solid-state drives are reportedly on their way (for the impatient or the merely cheap, NotebookReview has published a tutorial on making your own solid-state drive).

One laptop that's going to use a solid-state drive? The Lenovo ThinkPad X300. This week saw confirmation that the 13.3-inch ultraportable does in fact exist , though the company canceled the meeting in which we were supposed to receive our review unit. We think it had something to do with the BusinessWeek cover story on the X300, but to that we say: "BusinessWeek, SchmusinessWeek. Hook us up!"

Ahem.

Review units we did get our hands on this week included the Toshiba Portege R500, the Toshiba Satellite Pro A210, and the Gateway P-6831FX.

Elsewhere in the news, Apple released the latest Leopard ; we tested the performance of Windows Vista SP 1 ; Laptop magazine got their mitts on the small, cheap Everex Cloudbook; PC Magazine took a look at the subscription-based Everex Zonbu; and caffeine addicts will now look to AT&T instead of T-Mobile for Wi-Fi at Starbucks.

Finally, a woman in Washington, D.C. has put a price on the value of her laptop, which was lost by Best Buy after she turned it in for repairs: $54 million.

Have a great weekend!

About the author

    Tech expert Michelle Thatcher grew up surrounded by gadgets and sustained by Tex-Mex cuisine. Life in two major cities--first Chicago, then San Francisco--broadened her culinary horizons beyond meat and cheese, and she's since enjoyed nearly a decade of wining, dining, and cooking up and down the California coast. Though her gadget lust remains, the practicalities of her small kitchen dictate that single-function geegaws never stay around for long.

     

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