This Day in Tech: Hollywood's role in Netflix pricing; CNN live on the iPad

Too busy to keep up with the tech news? Here are some of the more interesting stories from CNET for Monday, July 18.

Too busy to keep up with today's tech news? Here are some of the more interesting stories from CNET (and elsewhere) for Monday, July 18.

CNN

• While many consumers are still moaning about the Netflix price hike, CNET's Greg Sandoval asks what it means for the future: is Netflix killing DVDs the way Apple helped kill off floppies?

• CNN and HLN cable-news channels will stream straight to mobile devices such as an iPad or iPhone--helping to broaden their "TV Everywhere" strategy. The service is available to customers of AT&T, Cox, Dish Network, and Verizon--but not Time Warner Cable customers.

• Wireless jobs are on the decline at U.S. wireless carriers, despite the fact that revenues are up. If regulatory approval goes through for the AT&T and T-Mobile merger, people are worried that this will mean even more job losses in the industry.

• App makers and Twitter feel some tension as the Federal Trade Commission investigates Twitter's relationship with app developers. Of course, the real question here is: are the makers partners or competitors? (The New York Times)

• Adobe Systems may have invented the Portable Document Format standard, but it just acquired EchoSign for electronic PDF signatures. This should make life a bit easier, so you don't have to bother printing out documents to scan/fax/mail the papers; instead, just to send a signature.

• Reports today indicate Apple will sell the iPhone 3GS contract-free for $350, and that Mac OS X Lion is already at stores and awaiting a release date. CNET's Josh Lowensohn breaks down what to expect when Apple post third-quarter earnings tomorrow.

• Cisco announced it's laying off 14 percent of its staff , and is selling a manufacturing plant in Juarez, Mexico, to Foxconn.

• Leave it to AAA to alleviate range anxiety surrounding electric cars. The motor club is running pilot programs in six areas to give a boost to electric car drivers whose batteries have died.

• When you see a cat or dog, the wagging tail or arched back can immediately tip you off to the animal's mood. Can technology make it as easy to read people? That's the idea behind the Necomimi, a pair of brain wave-sensing robotic cat ears made by Japanese company Neurowear. Watch as I put on robotic cat ears to find out.

 

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