Thief steals iPhones, leaves Samsung Galaxy

Police say a man broke into a wireless store in Virginia and stole several iPhones. He did, however, leave his own Samsung Galaxy behind.

It is not known what kind of Galaxy was allegedly left behind.

Crime can, on occasion, veer into the territory of art.

It can also brush itself against black humor.

You must decide what you see here, when I relay the details of a robbery at a Virginia wireless store.

The police allege that Travis Montgomery Snyder, 25, took to a glass case with vigor at DMW Wireless in Springfield, Va.

They say he didn't count on surveillance footage giving them an idea of his looks and build.

They also say, with an entirely straight face, that it isn't wise to leave your Samsung Galaxy behind when you're robbing a store of iPhones.

It wasn't the symbolism, I suspect, that moved the police. It was more the fact that they allegedly traced Snyder through the phone's subscription details.

Though the robbery occurred in February, The Washington Post reports that Snyder was arrested only on Monday.

The Galaxy was allegedly discovered lurking beneath broken glass near the front door. Perhaps Snyder had been using it to prop the door open to make his alleged escape easier.

Of course, it is excessively easy to make light of the idea that a man allegedly stole iPhones and left his Galaxy in part-exchange.

It is tempting to even suggest that the phone may have been too big to keep in his pocket, as he allegedly loaded his haul.

Some might offer an attempt at counterhumor, though.

An Apple employee, a Google employee, and a Samsung employee walk into a bar. Each has a prototype of a new phone.

The Apple employee leaves his behind . So does the Google employee .

The Samsung employee was the designated driver.

 

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