These clothes voice your fashion sense--literally

Berlin-based Trikoton creates sweaters, vests, scarves, and leggings that convert the frequency bands of audio messages into binary code for custom knitting patterns.

Trikoton
Customers record their voice message on the Trikoton site via a Flash interface. You wouldn't know it from the many dots pictured here, but all I'm saying is, "The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog." Screenshot by Leslie Katz/CNET
Paul Auster Edition scarf
The Paul Auster Edition scarf displays the audio pattern of someone reading a quote from Auster's "New York Trilogy." Trikoton

Back in the days of the CNET News Daily Podcast, my co-hosts and I liked to joke that we had "sexy podcast voice" whenever a cold left us sounding gravelly. Well, thanks to a German company that's turning voice patterns into knitting patterns, we can now wear our SPV™ on our sleeve.

Berlin-based Trikoton "transfers voices into clothes" by creating fashion that converts the frequency bands of audio messages into binary code for custom knitting patterns.

Customers record their voice message online via a Flash interface (it just takes a sec), and Trikoton incorporates the custom algorithm is into sweaters, vests, scarves, and leggings with an interactive, personalized twist.

Trikoton also sells premade designs--for example, a Paul Auster Edition scarf that goes for $79 knits into it this quote from the author's "New York Trilogy": "So, this is what is called speaking. I believe that is the term. When words come out, fly into the air, live for a moment, and die. Strange, is it not?"

Why, yes, it is. But cool, too, especially when those words end up on a sweater vest.

(Via Fashioning Technology)

 

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