Thecus introduces two new NAS devices

Thecus introduces two new NAS devices

The i4500R Thecus

Thecus on Tuesday introduced two new NAS devices aimed at enterprise and SOHO environments: thei4500R and i5500. Both are iSCSI-based NAS devices that promise to deliver high value for customers looking to store and secure valuable data.

In case you're unfamiliar with the technology, SCSI is a high-end storage interface standard, similar to SATA--used in most desktop and laptop computers to connect a computer's internal hard drive(s) to its motherboard--but much faster. iSCSI is an Internet Protocol (IP)-based storage networking standard for linking data storage facilities by carrying SCSI commands over IP networks. iSCSI is used to facilitate data transfers over intranets and to manage storage over long distances.

The i5500R Thecus

Powered by Intel's Xscale CPU and 512MB of DDR memory, both the i4500R and i5500 are guaranteed to provide very high data transfer speed--from 100MBps and up for read and write under RAID 6. The devices come with four and five hot-swappable SATA drive bays and accommodate up to 4TB and 5TB of storage, respectively. They also support a large variety of RAID configurations, including RAID 0, 1, 0+1, 3, 5, 6, 10, and JBOD.

Both the i4500R and i5500 use dedicated a hardware controller to configure the array, effectively shorting the required to build RAID than a software RAID array solution. This means when larger storage is required, users do not suffer from system downtime.

In addition, supporting block level data transmission over regular Ethernet, both products allows for numerous simultaneous host access through the iSCSI protocol at very high throughput speeds under RAID data protection. The i5500 and i4500R are estimated to cost $1,300 and $1,450 and will be available for purchase in the U.S. by the end of August or early September, respectively.

About the author

CNET editor Dong Ngo has been involved with technology since 2000, starting with testing gadgets and writing code for CNET Labs' benchmarks. He now manages CNET San Francisco Labs, reviews networking and storage products, and also writes about other topics from online security to new gadgets and how technology impacts the life of people around the world.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Don't Miss
Hot Products
Trending on CNET

HOT ON CNET

Is your phone battery always at 4 percent?

These battery packs will give your device the extra juice to power through all of those texts and phone calls.