The White Stripes take on film

Limited-edition "Meg" and "Jack" versions of Diana and Holga cameras offer retro views.

Peppermint filter
Peppermint filter offered for each camera. The White Stripes

The Fashionista blog noticed this new camera for White Stripes or vintage camera fanatics.

Meg and Jack White of the White Stripes have partnered with the Lomography Society, an international experimental-photography organization, on two reproduction cameras.

The purpose of the limited-edition cameras is to take "an analog look at life in the Digital Age," according to a statement on the White Stripes Web site.

I suppose this is a follow-up to their Digital Age release of the Icky Thump album on USB flash drives .

The "Meg" for $180 is a semireplica of the Diana camera from the 1960s. It comes with a 'Nobody Knows How To Talk To Children' ring flash, a Diana Vignettes photo book, a peppermint film mask filter, a camera strap and a lens cap.

It also comes with a note for modern-day photographers: "This camera uses all varieties of medium-format 120 film--to be purchased and developed at professional photo labs and specialty stores."

'Meg' Diana camera
The 'Meg' Diana camera. The White Stripes
'Jack' Holga
The 'Jack' Holga. The White Stripes

The "Jack" is a Holga flash camera for $180 that comes with--what else?--a fish-eye lens. The kit also includes a The World Through a Plastic Lens photo book, a 120 roll of film, three glass lens filters, a camera strap, a lens cap, opaque tape and two AA batteries.

Three thousand of each camera were made in the band's signature colors of red, white and black, and include the band's signature peppermint swirl.

Both cameras also come with a peppermint filter for making your images look like a scene out of Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, or should I say Charlie and the Chocolate Factory? That's the version in which Johnny Depp's Willy Wonka bears a striking resemblance to Jack White.

About the author

In a software-driven world, it's easy to forget about the nuts and bolts. Whether it's cars, robots, personal gadgetry or industrial machines, Candace Lombardi examines the moving parts that keep our world rotating. A journalist who divides her time between the United States and the United Kingdom, Lombardi has written about technology for the sites of The New York Times, CNET, USA Today, MSN, ZDNet, Silicon.com, and GameSpot. She is a member of the CNET Blog Network and is not a current employee of CNET.

 

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