The Real Deal 202: 3G vs. 4G (podcast)

Kent German joins us to explain what the heck 3G and 4G are and what the difference between them in.

Kent German joins us to explain what the heck 3G and 4G are and what the difference between them in.

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Episode 202

4G vs. 3G

What is 3g? What is 4G?
Does it unite GSM and CDMA?
And LTE?
When do we get it?
From whom? Is it global
What about WiMax?

http://www.cnet.com/8301-17918_1-10316811-85.html

QUESTIONS

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1. Tom & Rafe,

I have old home recorded VHS tapes sitting in boxes in my basement.
Some as old as 25-years. I have been told that the tapes start to
degrade overtime so I have been researching VHS to Digital backup.

I know I could get a video capture card for my PC, but I do not want to
tie up my computer for the next 6-months doing nothing but rip tapes.

I have looked at the VHS to DVD Recorders, but is this really a solution
since DVD-R discs probably have a worse shelf-life than VHS tapes?

I have also looked at the Sandisk V-Mate (CNET link below). I like the
sound of it, but is 640×480 good enough resolution for TV viewing?

Any thoughts?

http://reviews.cnet.com/portable-video-players-pvps/sandisk-v-mate/4505-6499_7-32104407.html?tag=mncol;lst

Thank You,
Mark

Answer: Video capture devices like Elgato’s Eye TV will do it, but I like efficiency and cost of a VHS-DVD combo. Costs around $150. Then you can do whatever with the DVDs.
R: Standard VHS resolution is about 250 lines, so the 480 lines of VHS is just fine. SVHS is 400 lines, still less than VGA.
Also, If you can afford it, use a service like Digital Pickle. It’s about $20 a tape, less for short one. They’ll put on DVD, and then you can copy the DVD to a hard disk and keep a rolling backup forever.

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2. I have a question. I am thinking about switching from iPod Touch to Zune HD. I found one program to switch. aac files to mp3 and basically what is does is creates a virtual CD-ROM drive in which you are suppose to burn a mp3 CD to the virtual CD drive with the music you want to convert. However, when I tried to do this with the music I bought on iTunes, it did not let me burn a mp3 CD. Is there an easier and cheap way to convert. .aac to mp3?

I am most likely at school during the live show so please email me the answer as well, although I will be listening to the podcast.

Thanks!
-Computerkid

Answer: Use iTunes! Converts to MP3 right there. Batch convert using all kinds of software http://www.sharewareguide.net/Audio-Multimedia/Audio-Encoders-Decoders/xilisoft-audio-converter.html

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3.

Hey Tom and Rafe,

A follow-up question about the iPad as an ebook reader:
When the Kindle first came out, I remember reading a lot about how the e-ink technology dramatically reduced eyestrain when compared to reading text off of a computer monitor.
Seems to me, the iPad is going to be a traditional LCD computer monitor in your lap.
Having never owned a Kindle, do you think there will be any truth to the assumption that reading books on the iPad will create a lot more eyestrain than e-ink books? Or was that a lot of Kindle marketing hype?

Love the show,

Rich the Recruiter

A: The issue is primarily contrast. Too much, as with a monitor that’s turned up too high, causes strain. Too little, as with a printed page in a dim room, also causes strain. The Kindle’s non-backlit screen is like a book: with good lighting, it’s ideal. A well-adjusted LCD monitor can also be fine. The problem with older monitors was that no matter what you did, the contrast between dark and light wasn’t high enough, and you got strain. Also, flicker from a CRT or a bad backlight causes strain.

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COMMENTS

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On episode 199 you noted that you weren’t so happy with Camtasia.

Check out http://www.screentoaster.com. It’s free, includes audio, and easy to use.

Charles from Sugar Land

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Hi Tom, Hi Rafe,

A little behind, but I just finished the episode on eReaders and noticed an obvious omission: Microsoft Reader.

http://www.microsoft.com/reader/

I used this on my first Pocket PC device back in the 1999/2000 timeframe and found it quite workable. That device had bigger screen than the current generation Windows Phones, and maybe that helped. I haven’t used it (or any other eReader) for a while, but note that it is still available.

They have both DRM content for sale and DRM-free content, and have versions for Windows Mobile, Tablet/UMPC and PC.

Mike

Toronto

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RAFE: 3D TV Showcase for April 8
http://t.cnet.com/155
or
http://bit.ly/demo3d

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Next time: Road Test

realdeal@cnet.com

http://realdeal.cnet.com/

http://forums.cnet.com

 

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