The race is on

It is the busiest time in "Network TV Land," because this is when we develop our marketing plans for the new shows and create all the advertising for TV, radio, print, outdoor, and digital.

OK, we've screened the pilots, discussed the merits of every show, developed a new fall schedule, and unveiled it to the world. So, do things slow down now? No! It's the busiest time in "Network TV Land," because this is when we develop our marketing plans for the new shows and create all the advertising for TV, radio, print, outdoor, and digital...you name it. But this is the fun part. CBS has a really solid schedule of returning shows, and four new ones will join the lineup in September. Now is the time we develop the marketing plans for each show.

Meanwhile, we continue our quest to learn as much as we can about how people find out about what's on television. Good news: the number one source is television itself. TV promotion is far and away the primary source, and that makes sense. There's nothing better than a "sample" of a product to see if the consumer is interested. And our samples have sight, sound, and motion, which I might argue is a lot better than a free cookie or box of soap (but there's nothing wrong with either of those).

After a new show is aired comes word of mouth. Much like a restaurant or movie, TV shows are right up there in the "trusted friend" category. Think about it: it's the water cooler effect. We talk about a new show at work or school the next day. It's about how television is part of the popular culture and social structure. Along with the water cooler effect comes media advertising on radio, local broadcast stations, and cable television; in print magazines and entertainment media (People and "Entertainment Tonight"); and the Internet. We focus our attention on all of these factors, and then some. We craft our marketing plans specifically in each medium for each new show.

So, there's a lot of creative development underway. Stay tuned.

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Tech Culture
About the author

    George Schweitzer's position as chief marketing officer at CBS gives him a unique opportunity not only to observe but also to help shape the ways technology is altering the television industry. A communications major at Boston University who joined CBS after graduation some 30 years ago, George is also an unabashed technology geek who specializes in the latest home automation and entertainment gear.

     

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