The HTC 1: The smartphone we wish was real

Designer Andrew Kim brings us a drool-worthy phone--that doesn't actually exist. Yet.

Do want. Andrew Kim

Attention HTC: We've found a designer you might want to talk to. Andrew Kim is a design nerd who operates a blog called design fabulous. On it, he shares photos of designs of everyday things he enjoys. He also shares designs he himself puts together for his portfolio. One of his latest concepts, the HTC 1, is absolutely beautiful, useful, and totally Crave-worthy.

Frustrated with HTC's sprawling and slightly confusing product matrix, Kim set out to design a top-tier, premium smartphone the manufacturer could use as a flagship device. Like all good modern design, he started with the functionality and then built around it. The result is a simple, elegant device that does things that even the EVO or iPhone 4 can't.

The bottom of the device, housing the home button and microphone as well as one of the two stereo speakers (as most phones have but one), rotates back, creating a stand, so the phone becomes a tabletop clock or can be used for hands-free video viewing. Very clever, very simple.

Kim even goes as far as to customize the UI for the phone, making an elegant combination that we'd like to see in our hands sooner rather than later. The home screen shows essentials like time, temperature, and how many unread messages are waiting. And it plays MP3s.

No mention of FaceTime-like video chatting, sadly. And since it's a concept at this point (we do love design concepts), we can't report on things like signal reception, battery life, call quality, and other real-world features. But, hopefully, HTC will give Kim a chance to make this device for real. With the problems the iPhone 4 is facing right now, a device like this could really benefit Apple's competitors.

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