The 404 Podcast 528: Where we leap back into...Y2K...10?

Stop caressing your PS3s and return the drums of apple sauce you bought to survive the Armageddon, and...turns out the Mayan calendar ended two years earlier, and much less severely than predicted.


Thanks to Shaun and his twin daughters Chloe & Kira for today's 404 featured sticker pic! Shaun Davis/The 404

Ten years after Y2K, the folks over at Sony still can't seem to remember to set their clocks right. The major firmware bug that shut down (almost) everyone's PlayStation 3s over the weekend turned out to a glitch in the " clock functionality incorporated in the system ," according to Patrick Seybold, Sony's senior director of corporate communications and social media.

Despite the company's claims that the glitch has been fixed, we're still harboring some serious doubts that Sony did anything to fix it and probably just waited until March 1 in hopes that the bug would fix itself, which thankfully it did. So go ahead and stop caressing your consoles and return the drums of apple sauce you bought to survive the Armageddon, and...turns out the Mayan calendar ended two years earlier, and much less severely than predicted.

It's OK Wilson...you can stay.

In less serious news, a new iPhone app called TigerText will hopefully help you succeed where Tiger failed. The application acts as a third-party call center for your text messages and erases your texts after a given period of time that you specify. Your options for lifespan go from 30 days all the way down to just one minute, depending on the NSFW-ness of your texts.

Both parties must pay for the service ($2.49 per month), and the app is only available for the iPhone for now (BlackBerry and Android support coming soon), but that's a small price to pay for the freedom to send those "Hey...you awake?" texts at 3 a.m. on a Saturday night.

Finally, we're happy to report that despite accusations of child labor abuse, Wilson G. Tang is still happily riding the Apple train, except that this time we're actually right there with him.

Apple recently released a report that exposed three facilities in China that employed underage workers to build its products. Apple subsequently terminated all of its contracts with that factory, but certain outlets continues to blow the story out of proportion, when in fact Apple independently investigated a situation that they had no legal responsibility to address, which deserves commendation in our book. You win this round, Tang...

All this plus a face-melting psychoanalysis Calls From the Public segment you won't want to miss on today's episode of CNET's The 404 Podcast!


EPISODE 528

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