The 404 306: Where just like the U.S. Postal Service, we're running out of money

Justin Yu returns to the show from his sojourn to Boston, but he comes back with some monster grandma glasses from the '60s and a $40 check from Airborne.


Justin Yu returns to the show from his sojourn to Boston, but he comes back with some monster grandma glasses from the '60s and a $40 check from Airborne. The 404 makes history by finally making it onto Urban Dictionary, with a word we still cannot write officially on CNET.

While listening to NPR, Wilson rediscovered the good ole days of car stereos. Not the fancy built-in ones that come with your shiny new Toyota Camry, but the $400 dollar stereos that you put into your '88 Chevy Nova with the flip-down faceplate. Remember when you couldn't turn on your car with your stereo on at the same time without burning out your batteries? Well, apparently, the theft of car stereos has gone way down thanks to built-in iPod connectors and proprietary dashboards.

Also on today's show, we chime in on Facebook's new redesign of their redesign. It's not really that bad. One of the Jonas Brothers makes a racial slur that all of Hollywood seems to be embracing. It's not funny, y'all! We wonder how many trees had to die for you to get a phone book that you'll never use. It's called Google, people. Finally, leaving your computer on at work apparently costs companies $2.8 BILLION dollars a year, but damn, we hate waiting 10 minutes for our computers to restart. Not to mention the time it wastes to turn off the 20 spyware programs and relaunch your IM clients, browsers, iTunes, and Microsoft Office just to get started on the work day.

All that and more on today's show. Plus, an obligatory poop joke. We need callbacks! Leave a voice mail at 1-866-404-CNET (2638).


EPISODE 306



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About the author

Wilson G. Tang is a producer for CNET TV. He hosts The 404 Podcast, which is a daily talk show about the intersection of technology and pop culture. He also writes, shoots, edits and produces for CNET. In addition, he is an award-winning filmmaker and storyteller, with several short narrative and documentaries under his belt.

 

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