Tesla offers Roadster to Canadians

Roaster starts selling in land of renewable electricity, but so far only out of U.S. offices.

Tesla Motors

Tesla Motors has begun offering its Roadster electric vehicle for the Canadian highway, the company announced Wednesday.

Tesla said in a statement that driving a Tesla Roadster in Canada can be thought of as even more kind to the environment than in other places since the bulk of the country's electricity is generated from renewable resources.

"An EV recharged from the current Canadian grid, on average, would reduce greenhouse gas emissions by about 85 percent compared to an equivalent gasoline-powered vehicle. In hydro-dominant British Columbia, Quebec, and Manitoba, the reduction would be an impressive 98 percent," said the Tesla statement.

Unfortunately for Canadians, they'll still have to travel to the U.S. if they want a showroom experience.

While Tesla plans to open in Ontario, British Columbia, and Quebec, as of now, delivery for Canadian Roadster orders will come out of its Seattle and New York offices.

The slight inconvenience will have no effect on compliance with Canadian safety regulations. The Tesla Roadster made for Canada will comply with all Canadian regulations for highway vehicles, according to the company.

Given how currencies have been fluctuating so drastically this last year, you may be wondering how it will be priced. Tesla is very conservative on this answer.

"The base price for Roadsters in Canada will be set closer to the start of deliveries, and pricing will reflect exchange rates at that time. In the United States, the base price is $109,000," said a company statement on the matter.

For a company who was written off by many as dead, Tesla has had positive news in recent weeks. In February, the company announced that the Department of Energy had been granted permission to issue Tesla loans in the millions to help it build a new plant in San Jose, Calif. The new Tesla Sedan is also set to be unveiled on March 26 .

About the author

In a software-driven world, it's easy to forget about the nuts and bolts. Whether it's cars, robots, personal gadgetry or industrial machines, Candace Lombardi examines the moving parts that keep our world rotating. A journalist who divides her time between the United States and the United Kingdom, Lombardi has written about technology for the sites of The New York Times, CNET, USA Today, MSN, ZDNet, Silicon.com, and GameSpot. She is a member of the CNET Blog Network and is not a current employee of CNET.

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Don't Miss
Hot Products
Trending on CNET