Target to be first to sell Facebook Credits

The megaretailer plans to sell $15, $25, and $50 Credits cards in its brick-and-mortar stores and on its site, the company announces. Sales will start on Sunday.

Facebook Credits gift card.
Facebook Credits gift card. Facebook

Facebook Credits is making its way to Target stores, the retailer announced on Wednesday.

Starting on Sunday, Target stores nationwide will feature Facebook Credits gift cards in increments of $15, $25, and $50. The Credits can be used on the more than 150 games and applications available on Facebook. The retailer said cards will also be available on Target.com.

Facebook Credits is quickly gaining ground as an alternative payment option on the social network. It's currently supported by wildly popular Zynga titles, FarmVille and Mafia Wars, as well as Bejeweled Blitz and the recently announced Madden NFL Superstars . Most titles still allow gamers to pay with credit cards, but it's Facebook's hope that eventually, users will buy all virtual goods with Credits.

Offering Facebook Credits gift cards in Target stores should help it get closer to achieving that goal. But Target is just one piece of the puzzle for getting Credits out into the wild. Target was careful to say it would be the first--not the exclusive--provider of Credits gift cards. It also pointed out that the $15 Credits card is available exclusively to Target, further indicating that Credits gift cards--at other price points, at least--will be coming to other retailers.

In an e-mailed statement, Facebook confirmed that it would, in fact, be offering its Credits gift cards at other retail stores. A company spokeswoman said the social network is "currently finalizing plans with additional retailers both in the U.S. and internationally." She didn't say which stores with which Facebook is currently in talks.

Update, 12:24 p.m. PDT Added comment from Facebook.

 

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