Taking my Mule hat off and starting something new

I will spend the next three months playing video games while I am out raising money.

It's a big day today. After two and a half years I've decided to transition out of my operating role at MuleSource and will be devoting my full time efforts to a new company I have been working on. It's clear that I am a glutton for start-up punishment.

I met with the board and the senior leadership team today and we all agreed the timing is right. We have a great new VP of Sales, and a new VP of Services along with the existing team. I initiated a CEO search in June and we expect to have a new person in place by the end of the year at the latest.

I started the search because I felt like a more "professional" CEO would be able to take the company to the next level--basically I felt like the opportunity was bigger than me and wanted to grow faster. Now that all the pieces are coming together I feel like I can step out cleanly, setting the stage for continued growth.

It's tough to let go away of something that you spent so much time on, but I feel good about where the company is and what I am doing next.

When Ross and I started the company in 2006 we felt like we had a "good idea". Fortunately the market has agreed and with tens of thousands of Mule instances in production worldwide, it's clear that the product works and people love it.

I completely believe in the Mule products and open source, and I need the company to be successful (remember I am still a large shareholder so don't expect me to go negative on the company) but the time has come to do something new.

The new company will be in stealth mode for a little while, but if you read my blog consistently you should be able to glean some clues.

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Software
About the author

Dave Rosenberg has more than 15 years of technology and marketing experience that spans from Bell Labs to startup IPOs to open-source and cloud software companies. He is CEO and founder of Nodeable, co-founder of MuleSoft, and managing director for Hardy Way. He is an adviser to DataStax, IT Database, and Puppet Labs.

 

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