Tablet owners weigh in with their biggest beefs

A new report from Q&A site FixYa uncovers the major complaints users have with the iPad Mini, Amazon Kindle Fire HD, Google Nexus 7, and Nook HD.

FixYa/Screenshot by Lance Whitney/CNET

Planning to buy a 7-inch tablet? A new report from the folks at FixYa reveals some of the top issues with today's crop of small-size tablets.

Apple's iPad Mini
New to the 7-inch tablet arena, the iPad Mini didn't trigger much in the way of specific problems reported by its users. Rather, people were more unhappy about what the device doesn't offer.

The Mini's 4:3 aspect ratio was cited by users as less than ideal for watching movies, which are typically better served by a screen with a 16:9 ratio. The small tablet also lacks the Retina Display used in the larger iPad, another complaint among its owners. And some cited the lack of storage space, though the Mini offers the same storage options as its bigger brother.

Overall, though, most users of the iPad Mini didn't consider the missing features a big deal and didn't regret buying the device.

Amazon's Kindle Fire HD
The Kindle Fire HD was praised for its high-definition screen and low price. Owners were less than pleased with the ads that pop up on the lock screen. But as FixYa noted, those ads can be turned off by coughing up a onetime fee of $15.

Other Kindle complaints focused on the tablet's slow performance when multitasking and challenges when using the onscreen keyboard.

Google's Nexus 7
The biggest gripe against the Nexus 7 centered on the Android 4.2 update released last month. That update apparently saddled many users with a string of problems, including sluggish multitasking, slow Web browsing, random reboots, and languid response times when opening apps.

Users also pointed to problems with the screen quality, the performance of the microphone, and the lack of storage space. But the Android 4.2 update was front and center the biggest issue.

For Nexus 7 owners experiencing trouble after the update, FixYa suggests powering up the tablet in "Recovery" mode and then clearing its cache.

Barnes & Noble's Nook HD
Finally, the Nook HD was lauded by users for the quality of its high-definition screen. But things went downhill from there. Poor touch-screen response, poor multitasking, slow overall performance, and low-quality audio were the top gripes among Nook owners.

In response, FixYa offered a number of suggestions, such as limiting your multitasking, clearing your browser history and cache, and turning off the device periodically.

"With 7-inch tablets being this year's must-have gadget, all of the major players have unveiled their own version over the last six months," FixYa CEO Yaniv Bensadon said in a statement.

"Of course, each one is bound to have both advantages and disadvantages, depending on what you plan to do with your tablet. There is a world of difference between each device -- with some suited for watching movies, some for gaming, and others for Web browsing."

FixYa's 7-inch tablet report was based on data from among its 30 million users and 8 million various problem and solution incidents.

 

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