T-Mobile to cut 900 jobs in latest restructuring (scoop)

More change for T-Mobile is afoot, as the fourth-place wireless carrier attempts to reduce its operating costs.

T-Mobile USA will restructure its business and hold another round of layoffs, as it seeks to reduce its operating costs.

The changes were announced in a memo from CEO Philipp Humm leaked to The Verge. T-Mobile told CNET that 900 employees would be cut as a result of the changes.

The cuts come on top of 1,000 jobs the carrier said in March it would shed as part of its ongoing restructuring plan. In the note, Humm said the company would contact employees personally about the cuts and changes in responsibilities.

The changes are expected to make T-Mobile a leaner business just as it makes a pricey bet on improving its current network this year and moving to 4G LTE next year. The carrier, which lags behind its larger rivals, has been aggressively repositioning itself after nearly a year in limbo waiting for the AT&T takeover.

"We are restructuring the organization and optimizing operations so that we can make critical decisions better and faster in response to market and customer demands," T-Mobile said in a statement. The company added that the reduced costs would enable it to invest in areas such as its network and its business-to-business operations.

Humm said the new structure would reduce the layers of management and allow for more nimble movement by the carrier. As with the March announcement, the cuts wouldn't affect customer service representatives, engineering technicians, or front-line employees at T-Mobile stores.

Updated at 12:58 p.m. PT:with a company response.

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