T-Mobile could hike up 2013 smartphone insurance

The carrier could introduce a new monthly deductible and tier schedule starting in mid-March.

Samsung Galaxy Note 2
T-Mobile phones like the Samsung Galaxy Note 2 could cost more to insure in 2013, if rumors prove true. Josh Miller/CNET

The cost of insuring your T-Mobile handset could rise in the new year, according to what could be a leaked internal document.

If the image proves true, monthly premium rates will remain untouched when the new plans take effect. Deductibles, however, are largely set to rise.

Save for the carrier's low-end devices, the cost to replace your phone will go up by a minimum of $10. For most smartphones the standard deductible rate will jump from $130 to $150.

Your lost or broken T-Mobile Android handset could cost more to replace come March. Phandroid

Although T-Mobile hasn't officially announced the pricing change, a carrier representative did confirm part of the rumor to CNET:

Monthly premiums for nearly all PHP customers remains unchanged, only those with Samsung Galaxy Note and Note IIs will see an increase in their monthly premiums to $11.99 for the PHP Bundle, $7.79 for Insurance Only, and $5.99 for Warranty Only.

T-Mobile;s statement is consistent with the rumor that higher-priced models, such as the Galaxy Note 2 , will get their own tier of coverage and will cost $175 to replace.

While this might seem a lofty figure, I'll remind you that a new replacement could cost $699 if you break or lose your phone and choose to replace it on the open market.

The new insurance rates could take effect March 17, according to details in the "leaked" bulletin.

Article updated at 3:49pmPT.

 

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