Syrian Electronic Army hacks into Xbox Twitter accounts too

News spread that the hacking group got into the Microsoft News Twitter account, but apparently it also breached Xbox's Twitter and Instagram accounts.

The Syrian Electronic Army hacked into the Microsoft News Twitter account and posted this message. Screenshot by Chris Matyszczyk/CNET

While it's been known for a couple of days that the Syrian Electronic Army hacked into the Microsoft News Twitter account , it's been revealed that the hackers also got into the Twitter accounts of Xbox and Xbox Support, along with Xbox's Instagram account, according to GameSpot.

The political hacking group that supports Syrian President Bashar Assad posted screengrabs of its exploits on its own Twitter account. The hack consisted of the Syrian Electronic Army writing messages on Xbox's accounts that read, "Syrian Electronic Army Was Here" and "Game On!" The group also posted images of Xbox's Twitter and Instagram accounts showing that it allegedly had administrator access.

Microsoft's accounts have since been wiped clean and a company spokesperson told CNET on Saturday that "Microsoft is aware of targeted cyberattacks that temporarily affected the Xbox Support and Microsoft News Twitter accounts. The accounts were quickly reset and we can confirm that no customer information was compromised."

The hacks happened on Saturday and seemed to have been primarily focused on the Microsoft News Twitter account and the company's TechNet blog. The Syrian Electronic Army wrote on the News Twitter account, "Don't use Microsoft emails(hotmail,outlook),They are monitoring your accounts and selling the data to the governments" and "Syrian Electronic Army Was Here."

Twitter appears to be the Syrian Electronic Army's favorite place to hack major companies and news organizations. On New Year's Day, it attacked Skype's Twitter and Facebook accounts and last year it hacked into the Twitter accounts of the parody news site the Onion , the messaging app Viber , the Associated Press , NPR, CBS , the Guardian, the BBC , and more.

About the author

Dara Kerr, a freelance journalist based in the Bay Area, is fascinated by robots, supercomputers and Internet memes. When not writing about technology and modernity, she likes to travel to far-off countries.

 

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