Synology DS207+ NAS doesn't leave much room for wishing

The addition of another hard drive and the RAID configurations is totally worth it.

The DS207+ is the same as the DS107+ except for being about 40 percent wider to support another hard drive and RAID capability. Dong Ngo/CNET Networks

I reviewed the Synology DS107+, a single hard-drive NAS device, a while ago and gave it an Editors' Choice award for its incredible amount of features, a well-thought-out Web interface, and its great performance. Still, I came way wishing it could take another hard drive and support RAID.

Apparently, I don't have to wish at all. Synology also offers the DS207+, a dual-bay NAS device that is the same as the DS107+ with the exception of the second hard-drive bay and RAID capability.

The DS207+ has the same number of ports (two USBs and one eSATA), LED status lights, and it looks similar to the DS107+, but it is about 40 percent thicker to make room for the second hard drive. It can take two SATA hard drives of any capacity. It also comes with robust firmware, called Disk Station Manager 2.0 NAS Management, that was unveiled in April, and a slew of features also found in the DS107+ such as Surveillance Station, Photo Station, Media Server, and so on.

Like the DS107+, the DS207+ is also a NAS enclosure. That means it doesn't come with any hard drives and you will have to buy and install the hard drives. It's very easy to do so as long as you can handle a Phillips-head screwdriver.

You can get the DS207+ now for about $350--that's about $50 more than the DS107+. In my opinion, the addition of another hard drive and the RAID configurations is totally worth it.

Still, now I wish it were cheaper.

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