Synology DS1812+ NAS server: More TBs than you can count with your digits

Synology announces the availability of its sub-$1000 DS1812+ NAS server that's capable of offering up to 32TB of storage space.

The new eight-bay DS1812+ NAS server from Synology.
The new eight-bay DS1812+ NAS server from Synology. Synology

Synology announced today its first eight-bay DiskStation NAS server, the DS1812+.

This is one of the first, if not the first, consumer-friendly NAS server on the market that offers eight native hard drive bays. This means that when populated with all 4TB hard drives, the server can offer up to 32TB of storage space.

Most computers have just about 1TB of storage space, which is enough (and then some) for most users. The DS1812+, by itself, can host 32 times that much, more TBs than you can count with your fingers and toes.

If that's not enough, the server can also work with two DX510 expansion units , each of which adds another five bays, to offer up to 72TB of storage space, before you have to resort to using its six USB ports to add more storage.

Other than the support for an extreme amount of storage space, the new DS1812+ offers basically the same features as other high-end NAS servers from Synology, such as the five-bay top-of-the-line DS1511+.

Synology says that since the DS1812+ is equipped with a faster dual-core 2.1GHz processor and 1GB (upgradable to 3GB) of DDR3 RAM, it offers even better performance than the DS1511+, up to 202MBps and 194MBps for reading and writing, respectively, over a gigabit network. The server also now supports USB 3.0.

Similar to the DS1511+, the new DS1812+ comes with front-facing drive bays that can be accessed without tools. Its ventilation fans are also easily replaceable. The server supports VMware, Citrix Xen, and Microsoft Hyper-V virtual networks and a vast amount of other features for both business and home users.

The new DS1812+ NAS server is available now and slated to cost $999 with no storage included.

About the author

CNET editor Dong Ngo has been involved with technology since 2000, starting with testing gadgets and writing code for CNET Labs' benchmarks. He now manages CNET San Francisco Labs, reviews 3D printers, networking/storage devices, and also writes about other topics from online security to new gadgets and how technology impacts the life of people around the world.

 

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