Synchronica connects iPhone to Exchange servers

Assuming it can get AT&T to sign on, Synchronica's software would let iPhone users get their corporate e-mail.

The iPhone may be the answer to what many people want in a smart phone, but it's unlikely to end the scourge known as CrackBerry addiction anytime soon: unless e-mail software like Synchronica's takes off.

Synchronica, based in the U.K., announced Wednesday that its Mobile Gateway 3.0 software will allow companies to deliver corporate e-mail to the iPhone without having to open the firewall or otherwise meddle with their security settings. It allows the iPhone's e-mail client to talk directly to Microsoft's Exchange e-mail servers through Outlook Web Access and doesn't require companies to install software on their end of the connection.

The problem is the software needs to be installed by a mobile operator, leaving it up to AT&T to support Synchronica's software to make the iPhone work like a corporate smart phone in the U.S. There's no indication that either Apple or AT&T is too concerned about the corporate market right now. Although most smart phone users--at least in the U.S.--use their phones to make sure they never miss a nauseating e-mail thread on project requirements, Apple has concentrated its iPhone marketing on consumers by playing up the video iPod and mobile Web browsing capabilities of the device.

The iPhone will likely remain a consumer smart phone until Research In Motion--the dominant mobile e-mail provider in the U.S.--and Apple decide whether they want to support the iPhone. Two weeks ago Visto said its push e-mail software would support the iPhone, but it's also a small player in the U.S. market. However, both Visto and Synchronica could be eying the European market, which is expected to receive its iPhones later this year.

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    Tom Krazit writes about the ever-expanding world of Google, as the most prominent company on the Internet defends its search juggernaut while expanding into nearly anything it thinks possible. He has previously written about Apple, the traditional PC industry, and chip companies. E-mail Tom.

     

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