Survey: Most won't buy new TV just to get 3D

Some 83 percent of people say that 3D technology isn't enough to compel them to buy a new set, a study from Deloitte has found.

Consumers don't like 3D glasses.
Consumers don't like 3D glasses, Deloitte found. CNET

Vendors might be trying to push 3D on consumers, but few appear willing to jump to the technology, a study released today by Deloitte has found.

According to the international accounting and consulting firm, 83 percent of consumers say that 3D isn't enough to make them want to buy a new television. Moreover, 60 percent of respondents said they simply aren't willing to pay extra for a television with 3D capabilities. Just 21 percent of those surveyed said they would pay 10 percent more for a 3D television over a set that doesn't have the technology.

A requirement for 3D glasses tends to be a major issue for consumers, Deloitte found. The firm said 30 percent of respondents reported that they didn't like wearing 3D glasses. Deloitte Director Ed Moran said in a statement that the glasses are "a barrier to the multitasking that consumers engage in while watching TV, including surfing the Web, reading e-mail, talking on instant message, and reading books, newspapers, and magazines."

Deloitte's findings aren't good news for 3D television vendors. Several companies have been pushing 3D as the next step in home entertainment. Sony, for example, currently offers several 3D television sets. And earlier this week, the company released a PlayStation 3 firmware update that allows consumers to watch Blu-ray 3D films on their consoles.

The news gets worse for 3D vendors. Deloitte found that 31 percent of respondents think 3D does not "enhance their entertainment experience." Another 13 percent of those surveyed said they "get physically ill [or] uncomfortable after watching 3D programming."

There is a single silver lining in Deloitte's findings for vendors. According to the firm, 40 percent of Generation Y respondents said they would buy a 3D set that require glasses. Approximately 55 percent of those people said they would buy a 3D TV if glasses were not required.

Deloitte's survey was conducted by the Harrison Group in June and July. The survey included responses from 1,960 people between the ages of 14 and 75.

 

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