Survey: More people looking for help on recycling

Report from shows more people with questions on how and where to recycle in 2009, with PCs, batteries, and TVs topping the list of search queries.

Do you know where or how to recycle that old TV or computer? If not, you're not alone.

Around 12 percent more people used the Web site last year than in 2008 to find out how to recycle their used items, according to a report (PDF) released Monday by

The company offers a searchable database at its Web site where you can type the name of a product like computers or cell phones along with your ZIP code and receive a list of local stores and facilities to drop off those items for recycling.

Among the top 10 products that popped up in searches, computers were number one, followed by batteries, televisions, and compact fluorescent light bulbs. Among the 10 most popular general categories, electronics topped the list.

"Electronics have always been popular searches on, but with the increased attention these devices have received, this past year was our highest yet," said Earth911 President Corey Lambrecht in a statement.

Earth911 said it tracked and compiled the list of search queries at its site using Google Analytics.

Surveys conducted on the Earth911 site last year also peeked into the recycling habits of its visitors. Around 35 percent of the people polled said that money is the main challenge in their efforts to recycle more. But 40 percent said that recyclability is the most important "green" factor when they buy a new product. provides a list of more than 117,000 facilities and programs to recycle around 240 different items. In addition to its Web site, the company also offers the toll-free number 1-800-CLEANUP and a free iPhone app called iRecycle.

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