Sun to acquire software patch specialist

Sun will buy Aduva in an effort to improve its own remote management services and make its computers more reliable.

Sun Microsystems has agreed to acquire Aduva, a small company whose products automate the installation of software patches on large numbers of Solaris or Linux computers.

The acquisition, announced by Sun Wednesday, dovetails with the company's effort to improve remote management services, an initiative that the company expects will make its computers more reliable and less of an administrative burden on customers. In 2004, the Santa Clara, Calif.-based company acquired SevenSpace, a remote management specialist.

Aduva is based in Sunnyvale, Calif., and has about 40 employees. The acquisition is expected to be completed by the end of June, but terms of the deal weren't disclosed.

Sun has refreshed its core server products, but the company also has been on a buying spree in an effort to restore revenue growth.

Aduva's software automates the delivery of software patches and can adjust its operations to different computer configurations. Patch management is the "No. 1 pain point" among computer administrators, said Don Grantham, executive vice president of Sun Services, in a statement.

Sun plans to sell Aduva's technology as a product that customers can install and operate on their own or as an automated service on the Sun Grid, computers whose processing power Sun sells to some customers.

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