Stanford goes with Zimbra over Microsoft and Google

Zimbra won at Stanford over some fierce competitors.

Is Zimbra enterprise-ready? Yes, it is.

At least, that's the news from Stanford, which today announced that it is replacing its campus-wide email system with Zimbra. TechCrunch outs the competition on the deal, too: Google's Gmail and Microsoft Exchange.

This is the latest in a series of victories for Zimbra, which includes Georgia Tech, University of Wisconsin, Texas A&M, Cal Poly, and University of Pennsylvania. Zimbra powers the email systems for over 300 universities worldwide. That comes in around an impressive 1.5 million email addresses ending in ".edu."

I use Zimbra on a daily basis and absolutely love it. I love it for some of the same reasons that Stanford chose Zimbra:

Zimbra was selected because the technology allows access to e-mail, calendar and contact lists from a single, unified web interface--enabling easy sharing of information among the various services, according to Ammy Hill, campus readiness specialist for IT Services. She added that Zimbra is an open-source, standards-based solution that works equally well on Windows, Macintosh and Linux operating systems.

It's that last bit that I particularly love. With Zimbra, no operating system is a second-class citizen. With more and more people switching to the Mac, this is particularly important. Who wants a Microsoft-centered existence that neglects those that haven't capitulated to Windows?

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About the author

    Matt Asay is chief operating officer at Canonical, the company behind the Ubuntu Linux operating system. Prior to Canonical, Matt was general manager of the Americas division and vice president of business development at Alfresco, an open-source applications company. Matt brings a decade of in-the-trenches open-source business and legal experience to The Open Road, with an emphasis on emerging open-source business strategies and opportunities. He is a member of the CNET Blog Network and is not an employee of CNET. You can follow Matt on Twitter @mjasay.

     

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