Stable version of Chrome 3.0 released

Google has completed work on a stable version of its Chrome browser, officially adding support for new Web video technologies and tweaking a few key features.

Google announced Tuesday that the third stable release of Chrome is ready for the world, a little over a year after its debut.

The stable version of Chrome 3.0 is much faster than its predecessors when it comes to JavaScript performance, according to Google. Google

Chrome releases evolve from developer previews to beta releases to stable ones, and the third version of Google's Web browser has now earned that coveted status. It's about 25 percent faster than the Chrome 2.0 stable version, and the new version (click here for download) also comes with a few tweaks.

Google redesigned the New Tab page with a click-and-drag mentality, added icons to the Omnibox to distinguish between searches, sites, and bookmarks when entering text in the address bar, and perhaps most significantly, added support for the video tag in the HTML 5 standard in a stable version of the browser.

Bringing HTML 5 technologies into Chrome is a huge part of Google's strategy for both the browser and Chrome OS, coming one day to a Netbook near you . The capabilities delivered by the video tag were a highlight of Google's presentation to developers at Google I/O in May : the tag allows Web developers to embed videos like they were photos, alleviating the need for plug-ins.

Let us know if you have any problems with the stable version of Chrome. Developer preview versions of Chrome 4.0 are well under way , but Google has yet to release a Mac version of the browser despite interest from luminaries such as Google co-founder Sergey Brin.

About the author

    Tom Krazit writes about the ever-expanding world of Google, as the most prominent company on the Internet defends its search juggernaut while expanding into nearly anything it thinks possible. He has previously written about Apple, the traditional PC industry, and chip companies. E-mail Tom.

     

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