Sprint exec. on 3G/4G hot spots (podcast)

At CES, Larry Magid chats with Steve Elfman, Sprint's president of network operations and wholesale, about the company's new 3G and 4G hot spots.

Steve Elfman Sprint

LAS VEGAS--On the eve of CES, Sprint announced its Overdrive 3G/4G Mobile Hotspot , a 4.5-ounce device measuring 3.15 by 3.14 inches by .61 inch that creates its own Wi-Fi hot spot.

The Overdrive can serve up to five Wi-Fi-enabled devices with a range of about 150 feet. I'm using it now with my laptop, an iPhone, and the new HTC Nexus One smartphone, which runs Google's Android operating system and supports Wi-Fi connectivity.

The device, which is manufactured in an unlocked state, can support Sprint's 3G and 4G networks. 3G connectivity, which supports speeds up to 3 megabits per second, is available in most parts of the United States. Typically, 3G runs between .5Mbps and 1.5Mbps.

Sprint's 4G network, which, in theory, can operate at up to 10Mbps, is currently available in 27 markets, including here, but it is slated to be rolled out to several more markets this year. By the end of 2010, Sprint says its 4G network will reach as many as 120 million people in the country.

At CES, I spoke with Steve Elfman, Sprint's president of network operations and wholesale, who described the device and how the company plans to roll it out in 2010.

Correction, 1:23 p.m.: This post mischaracterized how widespread Sprint's 4G network is slated to become this year. It is expected to be rolled out to several U.S. markets beyond its current 27.

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About the author

Larry Magid is a technology journalist and an Internet safety advocate. He's been writing and speaking about Internet safety since he wrote Internet safety guide "Child Safety on the Information Highway" in 1994. He is co-director of ConnectSafely.org, founder of SafeKids.com and SafeTeens.com, and a board member of the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children. Larry's technology analysis and commentary can be heard on CBS News and CBS affiliates, and read on CBSNews.com. He also writes a personal-tech column for the San Jose Mercury News. You can e-mail Larry.

 

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