Spinning More Leopard FUD

Adrian Kingsley-Hughes is a-scared of Leopard.

Every time Adrian Kingsley-Hughes blogs about Apple, a kitten dies.

Well, on the inside anyway.

This time out, AKH starts by noting how similar Leopard and Vista are.

Like Vista is [sic] long awaited...

Yeah. Six years, two and a half. What's the difference?

Oh, that's right. Four Three [Gar! Antlers must be growing into the Macalope's brain!] and a half years.

...like Vista the launch was delayed...

The Macalope will just point out that Bill Gates originally stated that Vista would ship in 2005 and it didn't ship until this year. Leopard was delayed six months. Even if you're inclined to be charitable toward Vista, it was still later by a factor of more than two.

...and like Vista, I got the impression that Apple rushed a bit to get it out of the door because the Mac fanboys were getting restless.

And we all know how Steve Jobs likes to base his decisions around what Artie MacStrawman thinks.

Sure, it's not unreasonable to get the impression Leopard was rushed for an October release -- certainly Apple didn't want to miss its already bumped release date. Kingsley-Hughes is magnanimous in his willingness to allow that Leopard -- an operating system delivered in two and a half years after a six month delay -- would have roughly the same level of stability that Vista -- delivered in six years after at least a year-long delay -- has.

Now, the horny one might think one would expect the operating system that took 240% longer to reach its users to demonstrably more stable but, whatever.

In the Macalope's experience over the last week with Leopard, it has been as solid as any major OS X release. He's experienced only minor glitches with some third-party applications and once trying to set up a new printer. The Finder -- while we still may not be seeing Apple's best work here -- is better and faster than ever.

Isn't that odd? An operating system update that actually makes your computer faster?

That said, I have to admit that I'm surprised and a little shocked at the types of bugs affecting Leopard, not to mention the volume of people that appear to be affected.

Well, that's weird. Wasn't the Macalope just pointing out how no one knows how many people are affected and there just isn't a good way to tell?

Yes. Yes, he was. Is this thing on? Hello? Hello?

Oh, and let's not forget the new Mac Trojan.

Yeah! And what about Scarecrow's brain?! And where's Jimmy Hoffa buried?! And how many licks does it take to get to the center of a Tootsie Pop?!

The Mac Trojan really has nothing to do with Leopard's release. It seemingly affects all versions of OS X, with 10.5 actually having the sole benefit of letting you at least see the malicious DNS server the trojan adds.

I'm hoping that updates are released before any of this stuff becomes an issue for me.

Adrian, you've got one Mac. Are you planning on upgrading from Tiger to Leopard on it again? Then you're not going to get the blue screen problem which really seems to have been the biggest. The Macalope frankly is not sure what crashing and performance issues you're talking about since you provide no link and, as he said, his experience has been that Leopard is as stable as Tiger and, in some key operations, is faster not slower.

Again, have people upgrading to Leopard had some problems? No question. As is the case with any dot-oh release (or, in OS X's case, dot-something dot-oh). Is the remedy to simply lock yourself in your underground bunker until 10.5.1 is released? Well, no. For starters, 10.5.1 might not solve all these issues. But also, you might not run into these issues in the first place.

Read up on the affected third-party applications and other issues, do a full backup (or two!) and go for it if you want to.

You're going to want to do those things anyway.

Seriously, these nattering nabobs of negativity who run around the silly punditsphere trying to scare people away from things they could use right now ("Wait for 10.5.1! Wait for the second rev of the iPhone! For god's sake, don't buy anything new and/or shiny!") positively drive the Macalope to fits of apoplexy.

This is not alchemy, folks. And Halloween is over.

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About the author

    Born of the earth, forged in fire, the Macalope was branded "nonstandard" and "proprietary" by the IT world and considered a freak of nature. Part man, part Mac, and part antelope, the Macalope set forth on a quest to save his beloved platform. Long-eclipsed by his more prodigious cousin, the jackalope (they breed like rabbits, you know), the Macalope's time has come. Apple news and rumormonger extraordinaire, the Macalope provides a uniquely polymorphic approach. Disclosure.

     

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