Sony refreshes Bravia home theater line for 2008

Sony's proprietary S-AIR wireless technology is a key feature of its 2008 Bravia line of all-in-one home theater systems.

Sony Bravia DAV-HDX275
Sony

In 2007, Sony extended the previously TV-only Bravia moniker to cover its flagship all-in-one home theater systems for the first time. The branding extension must've been a success, because a new round of Bravia home-theater-in-a-box systems (HTIBs) is on deck for 2008. All four 2008 Bravia models will include the following baseline features. (Where applicable, we've taken the liberty of translating many of the terms from Sony-ese into English.)

  • Single chassis DVD receiver: The amplifier/receiver includes a built-in five-disc CD/DVD changer, with built-in support for standard Dolby and DTS surround modes.
  • HDMI output: DVDs can be upscaled to 1080p resolution when connected to compatible HDTVs.
  • 5.1 surround sound: Each system includes five satellite speakers and a subwoofer.
  • Bravia Theatre Sync: Sony's implementation of HDMI-CEC lets the system interact with compatible Sony TVs when they're connected via HDMI, automating some processes such as input switching.
  • Digital Cinema Auto Calibration (DCAC): This is simply the company's name for the built-in system that customizes the speaker levels to the particular sonics of your room.
  • Dialogue Audio Enhancer: Otherwise known as "midnight mode," this feature normalizes volume levels for late-night viewing.
  • DM Port compatibility: All Bravia systems include support for Sony's proprietary DM Port accessories: the TDM-NC1 Wi-Fi music streamer, the TDM-NW1 Sony Walkman MP3 player dock, and the TDM-BT1 Bluetooth adapter, all of which must be purchased separately.
  • Outboard iPod dock: The fourth DM Port accessory, the TDM-IP1 iPod dock, is included.
  • Wireless rear speakers: Each Bravia model includes an option to set up the two rear speakers wirelessly. (Whether the wireless speaker accessory is included or needs to be purchased separately varies from model to model.)
  • S-AIR compatibility: New for 2008, the Bravia systems are compatible with Sony's proprietary S-AIR wireless technology , meaning they can stream music to a small speaker system (the AIR-SA10) located elsewhere in the home. (Whether the AIR-SA10 and its companion transmitter is included or needs to be purchased separately varies from model to model.)

Specific details for each system are as follows:

Key features of the Sony DAV-HDX275 (shown above):

  • Option to add a rear wireless speaker kit (WAHT-SA10)
  • Option to add S-AIR transmitter (EZW-T100) with S-AIR Air Stations (AIR-SA10)
  • Available in March for $300

Sony DAV-HDX279W

Sony DAV-HDX279W
Sony

Key step-up features of the Sony DAV-HDX279W:

  • Includes the rear wireless speaker kit (WAHT-SA10)
  • Option to add S-AIR Air Station receiver/speaker (AIR-SA10)
  • Available in March for $400

Sony Bravia DAV-HDX277WC

Sony Bravia DAV-HDX277WC
Sony

Key step-up features of the Sony DAV-HDX277WC:

  • Includes one S-AIR Air Station receiver/speaker (AIR-SA10)
  • Option to add wireless rear speaker kit (WAHT-SA10)
  • Available in March for $400

Sony Bravia DAV-HDX576WF

Sony DAV-HDX576WF
Sony

Key step-up features of the Sony DAV-HDX576WF:

  • Includes one S-AIR Air Station receiver/speaker (AIR-SA10)
  • Includes wireless rear speaker kit (WAHT-SA10)
  • Height adjustable floor standing speakers
  • Available in March for $500

Unlike Panasonic and Samsung , Sony's 2008 lineup doesn't include a system with a built-in Blu-ray player. Instead, the company is offering some more traditional component-based HTIBs designed to be paired with its standalone Blu-ray players or the PlayStation 3.

Assistant Editor Jeff Bakalar contributed to this story.

About the author

John P. Falcone is the executive editor of CNET Reviews, where he coordinates a group of more than 20 editors and writers based in New York and San Francisco as they cover the latest and greatest products in consumer technology. He's been a CNET editor since 2003.

 

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