Sony previews supertelephoto, other SLR lenses

The electronics giant shows models of six forthcoming lenses at the PMA photo show. A supertelephoto 28-75mm model are geared for full-frame SLR cameras.

Sony showed concept models of six new SLR lenses at the PMA show.
Sony showed concept models of six new SLR lenses at the PMA show. Stephen Shankland/CNET News

LAS VEGAS--Sony showed off models of a forthcoming supertelephoto and five other lenses Monday at the Photo Marketing Association trade show, a new sign the electronics giant is holding tight to its ambition to be a major player in the digital SLR market

"Sony is passionate in proving better lens development," said Shigeki Ishizuka, president of Sony's digital imaging business group, at a news conference held here in conjunction with PMA. He said Sony now ranks third in the SLR market.

Shigeki Ishizuka, president of Sony's digital imaging business group.
'Sony is passionate in proving better lens development,' said Shigeki Ishizuka, president of Sony's digital imaging business group. Stephen Shankland/CNET News

Sony, which entered the SLR market with its Alpha line after acquiring the assets of Konica-Minolta in 2006, is the only camera maker to challenge market leaders Canon and Nikon with a high-end model using a large sensor the size of a frame of 35mm film. Most SLRs use smaller sensors that are less sensitive but much less expensive to manufacture.

Two of the six concept lenses Sony showed are geared for these higher-end full-frame cameras, said Reiji Seki, a planner of Sony's lens and accessory line. They are the supertelephoto, of unspecified focal length, and a 28-75mm zoom.

The other four lenses are for Sony's smaller-sensor SLRs: a 50mm f1.8, 30mm f2.8 macro, 18-55mm f3.5-5.6 zoom, and 55-200m f4-5.6 zoom.

Sony didn't say when any of the lenses would be available.

About the author

Stephen Shankland has been a reporter at CNET since 1998 and covers browsers, Web development, digital photography and new technology. In the past he has been CNET's beat reporter for Google, Yahoo, Linux, open-source software, servers and supercomputers. He has a soft spot in his heart for standards groups and I/O interfaces.

 

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