Sony creates wireless chip capable of 6.3Gbps

Powerful wireless setup jointly developed by Sony and the Tokyo Institute of Technology could significantly advance the transfer speeds of wireless routers.

Blistering speeds, all shown here in this block diagram. Sony

If you think 802.11n Wi-Fi is the bee's knees, check out this new ultra-powerful wireless setup jointly developed by Sony and the Tokyo Institute of Technology.

The two chips in this advancement push a staggering data rate of 6.3Gbps, which is 14 times the transfer speed in commercially available routers (450Mbps).

According to the press release, "implementation of this technology will enable users to transmit and receive data at much higher speeds between mobile devices without the need for cable connections. This technology will also enable users to enjoy uncompressed high-quality video streaming from a mobile device to a display."

This means that one day in the future we could transmit an uncompressed Blu-ray rip of a movie from our smartphone to a TV or media box. We recommend a 64GB MicroSD card for such matters, though. Unfortunately, there's no timetable for when we'll see this 6.3Gbps wireless technology implemented in personal devices.

Professor Akira Matsuzawa, Associate Professor Kenichi Okada, and others from the Tokyo Institute of Technology developed the radio frequency chip, while Sony created the corresponding low-power baseband chip and managed overall chip development.

The system operates on a millimeter-wave 60GHz band (2.16GHz per channel), employing 802.15.3c standards. CNET networking editor Dong Ngo, however, predicts that this standard will have problems catching on since it generally offers much shorter ranges than the existing 802.11n and upcoming 802.11ac standards.

The radio frequency and baseband chips. Sony

 

Join the discussion

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Show Comments Hide Comments
Latest Galleries from CNET
The best and worst quotes of 2014 (pictures)
A roomy range from LG (pictures)
This plain GE range has all of the essentials (pictures)
Sony's 'Interview' heard 'round the world (pictures)
Google Lunar XPrize: Testing Astrobotic's rover on the rocks (pictures)
CNET's 15 favorite How Tos of 2014