Songza Sets streams music with a human touch

The latest streaming start-up to challenge algorithms with real humans, Songza Sets offers up daily, themed music playlists, hand-picked by music experts.

Pandora's model of determining what you might like to listen to with an algorithm is being challenged by companies like Slacker, who use human music experts to build and fine-tune playlists. Songza Sets is another company that is trying to combine the human touch with an on-demand, streaming distribution model. Songza Sets presents daily, hand-picked, 12-song playlists that follow a certain theme. The result is a thoroughly enjoyable listening experience that lets users discover great new music.

A Songza Set containing indie songs that have been used in commercials. Screenshot by Harrison Hoffman/CNET

The themes for Songza Sets are fairly creative to this point. For example, one set is made up of indie songs that have been featured in commercials, so listeners are treated to Phoenix's "1901," featured in a Cadillac commercial, as well as The Arcade Fire's "Wake Up" from the trailer for "Where the Wild Things Are." Each song is accompanied by a short description, explaining why it was included. Every week, Songza Sets also features a set containing a selection of songs from the Hot 100 from the past week.

Songza's design works really well and a great looking graphic accompanies every set it puts out. They have also set up a Twitter account that tweets when new sets are posted. However, an RSS feed on the Songza Sets site is conspicuously absent.

Screenshot by Harrison Hoffman/CNET

While I am a big fan of automated music services like Pandora, I do think that there is something to be said for a human touch when dealing with music. While it isn't a total streaming music replacement and won't kill Pandora or Slacker, Songza Sets is a nice, once-a-day exploration of a hand-picked, thematic playlist.

Via VentureBeat

About the author

    Harrison Hoffman is a tech enthusiast and co-founder of LiveSide.net, a blog about Windows Live. The Web services report covers news, opinions, and analysis on Web-based software from Microsoft, Google, Yahoo, and countless other companies in this rapidly expanding space. Hoffman currently attends the University of Miami, where he studies business and computer science. Disclosure.

     

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