Snow full of bacteria

The next time it's snowing and you open your mouth to catch snowflakes on your tongue, think about this: Scientists say they're full of bacteria.

The next time it's snowing and you open your mouth to catch snowflakes on your tongue, think about this: Scientists say they're full of bacteria. That's right. Bacteria are everywhere in the atmosphere, and a large number of them can even cause diseases in plants, according to scientists at Louisiana State University.

When snow and rain form in the sky, the moisture needs something to grab onto in order to condense. The scientists found that this something is bacteria. The group of scientists examined precipitation from various locations including France, Montana, and the Yukon. The bacteria were most prevalent in France.

Read the full Science Daily story here: "Study Shows Bacteria Are Common in Snow"

About the author

Desiree Everts DeNunzio is a freelance editor and writer. She's dabbled in digital media and technology for the past decade, including stints at CNET News and Wired magazine. When she's not fiddling with various gadgets, she spends her time running after chickens and her own brood.

 

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