Snoopr does Digg for deals

Find deals on gadgets with Snoopr.

Snoopr is a new site with an old idea. It lets people submit deals they've found on all sorts of things from consumer electronics to food items. These items go into an upcoming feed, where others can "snoop" them up. What really makes the site stand out is its aesthetic, which serves up a clean and simple interface with a few goodies like a percentage marker that lets you know how much you're saving off retail, and a simple rating system that shows what other Snoop members think of the deal. Together the two give you a quick way to sort the good from the bad, and hunt out what's worth your cash.

The stuff you'll find on Snoopr is similar to other deals sites like Slickdeals, Dealnews, Fatwallet, and others in the dwindling availability of each product. What really sets it apart is its tracking system, which lets you show off items you've bought to others along with a roundup of how much money you've saved by using the site. It also shows how users are interacting with the site in real time, similar to Digg's Diggspy.

Find deals on all sorts of items en masse with Snoopr. CNET Networks

Of course what really makes sites like this work is a healthy user base that is submitting things right away and cleaning up old, expired deals. In that regard, you're not going to find as many heads as the competition's got. Part of the problem is the submission process, which requires users to fill out a sizable form to get a deal up. I far prefer a system that will scrape what it can from any URL you give it to help take a step out of the process. That being said, the tools to flag items that have been submitted are simple and intuitive.

I'm a big fan of sites like this. While Pricegrabber, and Google product search do a decent job at giving you a smattering of product prices, this time of year it's all about getting sizable discounts on sale items.

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