SNL skit skewers complaints about the iPhone 5

"Saturday Night Live" has some fun bringing the tech press and Chinese factory workers together to chat about Apple's smartphone.

SNL's Bill Hader as CNET reporter Josh Savage, no relation to CNET's real Apple reporter, Josh Lowensohn. NBC

"Saturday Night Live" offered its satirical take on various complaints about Apple's new iPhone 5 in a skit that skewered the tech press and featured a confrontation with SNL's version of Chinese factory workers who make the iPhone.

Guest SNL host Christina Applegate as "Tech Talk" host Caitlin Owens started the skit interviewing reporters from CNET (SNL's Bill Hader playing "Josh Savage" in a nod to our own intrepid Apple reporter, Josh Lowensohn), Wired, and Gizmodo about a "plethora of glitches and design flaws."

The three "reporters" in serious geek mode expressed their concerns about the flawed Apple maps, purple screen haze, and more absurdly that the iPhone 5 is too thin and light. They were then joined by three Chinese factory workers (no mention of Foxconn), speaking in bad, fake Chinese accents.


The "workers" shared their perspective on the iPhone 5 issues with the complainers. For example:

"You want Starbucks and it takes you to Dunkin Donut. That must be so hard for you." 

"I guess we are lucky. We don't need maps. We sleep where we work."

The skit also included some new forms of communication -- "traditional sarcastic dance" and "sad Chinese violin." 

Asked if they would like to complain about a product made in America, one of Chinese workers (SNL's Fred Armisen) said: "What does America make? Does diabetes count as a product? If not, we have to get back to you."

• CNET's complete coverage of the iPhone 5

Featured Video
This content is rated TV-MA, and is for viewers 18 years or older. Are you of age?
Sorry, you are not old enough to view this content.

iPhone 6S chip controversy over battery life

Not all new iPhones have the same processor chip, but Apple says differences in performance are minimal. Apple also pulls ad-blocking apps over privacy concerns, and Netflix raises its price again.

by Bridget Carey