Snapchat apologizes for jump in spam

The photo-sharing service says it's trying to resolve the new issue of an increase in spam aimed at its members.

Snapchat

Another day. Another Snapchat apology.

Fresh from the bad buzz over its recent security snafu , the site is now trying to grapple with a bump in spam. In a blog posted Monday, Team Snapchat said that some members complained of an increase in Snap spam this past weekend. The tech folks at the company are trying to resolve the problem, according to the blog.

As far Snapchat knows, the rise in spam is unrelated to the Find Friends issue. Instead, the team cited such an increase in spam as "the consequence of a quickly-growing service." To cut down on spam, Snapchat users can tweak their settings to make sure that "Only My Friends" can send them Snaps.

This is the second apology this month to come from the mouth of Snapchat. Last week, the company expressed its regrets over the unwanted holiday incident that potentially exposed the usernames and phone numbers of 4.7 million members . Concern and anger were raised not just over the vulnerability in the Find Friends feature but over Snapchat's prior knowledge of the flaw.

Snapchat's full blog on the spam issue appears below:

Snap Spam Update

We've heard some complaints over the weekend about an increase in Snap Spam on our service. We want to apologize for any unwanted Snaps and let you know our team is working on resolving the issue. As far as we know, this is unrelated to the Find Friends issue we experienced over the holidays.

While we expect to minimize spam, it is the consequence of a quickly growing service. To help prevent spam from entering your feed, you can adjust your settings to determine who can send you Snaps. We recommend "Only My Friends" :)

We appreciate your patience and we'll keep you posted.

Love,

Team Snapchat

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Internet
About the author

Journalist, software trainer, and Web developer Lance Whitney writes columns and reviews for CNET, Computer Shopper, Microsoft TechNet, and other technology sites. His first book, "Windows 8 Five Minutes at a Time," was published by Wiley & Sons in November 2012.

 

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