Slacker revamps logo, apps, and Web site

Slacker Radio has rebranded itself in an effort to step out of the shadows of its competitors Pandora and Spotify.

Slacker's new look has rolled out on the company's Web site, as well as on its different mobile apps. Slacker Radio

SAN FRANCISCO--At an invite-only press event in San Francisco, popular streaming music service Slacker Radio last night unveiled a completely revamped brand. The company's name remains, but Slacker's look and feel have been significantly simplified.

Of course, with the rebrand, Slacker's Web site and product designs have been updated with cleaner, more modern looks as well. Gone are the dark tones, textures, and gradients that crowded Slacker's interfaces in the past. Now, Slacker's multiplatform face is made up of brighter colors, clean lines, and lots of white space, which bring it more in line with what seem to be modern Web design standards.

As great as Slacker's product has been (check out our glowing review of the Android app), the company has for some time existed in the shadows of bigger names in streaming media like Pandora and Spotify. Today, with its more attractive design, it appears that Slacker is poised to make some headway in its quest for music streaming notoriety. To help in its cause, the San Diego-based company is also rolling out an advertising campaign that not so subtly antagonizes its competitors.

One of the more ubiquitous streaming services, Slacker Radio is available on the Web, as well as on Android, iOS, Windows Phone, BlackBerry, Xbox 360, and smart TVs. Additionally, Slacker has distribution deals with Ford, GM, Chrysler, Acura, Honda, Scion, Subaru, and Tesla.

To celebrate the launch of the rebranded service, users can access all of Slacker Premium's features for free on February 14 and 15. Otherwise, accounts come in three different tiers: Free, Plus for $3.99 per month, and Premium for $9.99 per month.

About the author

Jaymar Cabebe covers mobile apps and Windows software for CNET. While he may be a former host of the Android Atlas Weekly podcast, he doesn't hate iOS or Mac. Jaymar has worked in online media since 2007.

 

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