Skype helps keep half of long-distance relationships alive, survey says

A new survey shows that not only do 96 percent of respondents feel a closer connection to their partner when using Skype, but 29 percent have engaged in "naughty" calls.

Microsoft

Ten years ago most people would caution someone from entertaining a long-distance relationship -- they're almost always doomed to fail. When significant others can't see each other the heart can grow cold.

However, new research shows Skype could be lessening long-distance relationships' bad outcomes. Microsoft's Idea Lab conducted a survey of Skypers in the US and UK in January and found that 96 percent of respondents said the video call service gives them a closer connection to their far-away loved one.

It's not only about a closer connection, however, because one could argue a phone call could do the same. Sixty-one percent of the respondents said video calling actually improves their romantic relationships; and 47 percent credit Skype with "keeping the love alive" while far apart.

While users can't touch, hug, or kiss via Skype, they can gaze into each other's eyes, blow kisses, and other things. In fact, according to Idea Lab, 29 percent of the survey respondents admitted to taking part in a "naughty" call with Skype. While it's unclear what exactly that means, some things seem better left unsaid.

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About the author

Dara Kerr is a staff writer for CNET focused on the sharing economy and tech culture. She grew up in Colorado where she developed an affinity for collecting fool's gold and spirit animals.

 

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