Shure announces $99 SE110 earphones

The SE110 continues the Shure tradition of top-notch sound quality but brings a significantly lower starting price point to potential customers--these earphones will set you back just $99.

Donald Bell

This morning, Shureannounced another addition to its SE line of sound-isolating earphones, the SE110. The new model continues the Shure tradition of top-notch sound quality but brings a significantly lower starting price point to potential customers--the SE110 will set you back just $99. (Comparatively, the next model up the line--the SE210--is attached to a $179.99 price tag.) That's not exactly inexpensive in the scheme of earbuds, but then the SE110s aren't cheap in any regard. These earphones employ a balance armature driver in each 'bud, rather than cheaper and more common dynamic speaker drivers found in many sub-$100 sets. It shows, too: preliminary testing proved that the SE110s are quite capable of living up to Shure's sound standards. Still, the bass isn't as tight as with more expensive models, such as the SE310s.

The SE110 package contains some handy extras, such as a soft-shell carrying case and the standard Shure fit kit, which includes the fantastically sound-isolating, compressible foam tips. It's also worth noting that all of Shure's consumer earphones--including the SE110s--will feature iPhone-compatible jacks moving forward.

Read the full CNET Review

Shure SE110 Sound Isolating (White)

The Bottom Line: If you're looking for a relatively affordable pair of earphones that can withstand both audiophile scrutiny and physical abuse, the Shure SE110 can rise to the challenge. / Read full review

Read the full CNET Review

Shure SE110 Sound Isolating (Black)

The Bottom Line: If you're looking for a relatively affordable pair of earphones that can withstand both audiophile scrutiny and physical abuse, the Shure SE110 can rise to the challenge. / Read full review

About the author

    Since 2003, Jasmine France has worked at CNET covering everything from scanners to keyboards to GPS devices to MP3 players. She currently cohosts the Crave podcast and spends the majority of her time testing headphones, music software, and mobile apps.

     

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