Fiverr freelance marketplace raises $30M in Series C round

The new funding is announced in conjunction with a site redesign meant to make it easier to find services, which start at $5 a pop.


Fiverr, an online marketplace that lets people buy and sell services starting at $5 a pop, is now $30 million richer, the company has confirmed.

Speaking to the Wall Street Journal in an interview published Monday, Fiverr CEO Micha Kaufman confirmed that the company has raised $30 million in a Series C round of financing. In total, Fiverr has raised $50 million since its founding five years ago. Bessemer Venture Partners, a previous investor in the firm, has increased its stake. Qumra Capital led the round. Accel Partners also invested in the company.

The funding was announced in conjunction with a site redesign meant to make it easier to find services.

Fiverr primarily features freelancers who offer their services. Fees start at $5 but can go much higher, depending on complexity, seller rating, and type of work. Fiverr gets a 20 percent take, which is essentially how the company generates its revenue. The services are broken into more than 100 categories and include graphic design, writing, photography, voiceovers, and illustrations.

There is no shortage of companies offering similar marketplaces. TaskRabbit and Gigwalk are among its competitors, though they have some categories that Fiverr does not.

The Israel-based company plans to use the new funding to market its service and continue to build out its mobile app. The company also hopes to expand beyond the 196 countries it's already tapping, according to the Journal and the company's site. Fiverr did not provide the Journal with a valuation.

CNET has contacted Fiverr for comment. We will update this story when we have more information.

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