Service remotely encrypts or deletes data

New "Theft Recovery" service from Everdream makes it possible to encrypt or delete data even after a PC goes missing.

Desktop management service provider Everdream on Tuesday announced a service that makes it possible to encrypt or delete data even after a laptop has gone missing.

The new Everdream "Theft Recovery Managed Service" allows organizations to retain control over lost or stolen PCs and laptops, the Fremont, Calif., company said in a statement. The service also can assist law enforcement with the tracking, locating and recovery of computers, the company said.

When a missing PC is connected to the Internet, it automatically contacts Everdream. This triggers encryption or deletion of data on the computer, based on the customer's setting, Everdream said.

At the same time, information on the Internet connection used by the lost computer is stored. This can help locate and recover the PC, Everdream said. The service won't work, however, if the computer's hard disk has been formatted, because the Everdream software resides on the hard disk, an Everdream representative said.

Sensitive data stored on PCs has become a hot topic, particularly since data breach notification laws have been passed that require notification when such data is lost. Recently, a Fidelity Investments laptop with information on almost 200,000 current and former Hewlett-Packard employees was stolen.

The theft recovery service is in addition to Everdream's other services, which include asset management, software distribution, online backup, virus protection and patch management. The new service costs $6 per computer per month and requires at least one of the other services, the representative said.

Everdream manages more than 140,000 desktops for clients including ADP, Korean Airlines, Midas,, Sonic Automotive and Sylvan Learning Centers, the company said.

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